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11
Mon, Dec

Issue 32 | Social Impact and Innovative Models to Support Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Their Families Throughout the Lifespan

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Dear Reader,

There are 7,000,000 individuals…

with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the United States, however only 25% receive services through publicly-funded programs. The other 75% of individuals are supported by their family through informal and private services paid for with their own resources. As the health and human services system moves to a model of home and community-based services, families who have been supporting their family members at home are turning to the public system for support. Additionally, as caregivers age, they need innovative supports to maintain care at home. Similarly, there are subgroups within the I/DD community with severe and complex medical and behavioral needs that are currently unmet, whose interests could be protected by person-centered, not monolith, regulations. Given these trends there has never been a more crucial time in history where innovative community programs, services and devises are needed to support the I/DD population and their families.

While services and the quality of life for individuals with disabilities has improved as a result of advocacy by families and self-advocates; available innovative technologies and services have not yet reached the I/DD population. There is still much work to be done to fully support and include individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in our society and to support their caregiving families. As an entrepreneurial society, we have yet to embrace and support social innovations and technologies that can help to transform the lives of the I/DD community in healthcare, housing, education and the workforce. 

To publish this edition, The Social Innovation Journal has joined forces with Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC)’s PersonLink, Woods Services, and Bancroft as well as businesses, government, nonprofit experts, academics and leading social innovation practitioners to discuss the most promising innovations in and for the I/DD community. 

This edition will discuss how we continue to innovate services and products to better support the I/DD community and their families with partnerships among government, public and private sector, as well as highlight innovative practices that demonstrate integration, collaboration, and effective resource allocation.

Social Innovations Journal thanks our sponsors Delta-T Group; General Health Care Resources, Woods Services, Bancroft, and Public Health Fund for their generous support to make this publication and launch conference possible.

 

Yours in Innovation,

Nicholas Torres, Co-Founder
Tine Hansen-Turton, Co-Founder